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Visual Methods and Ethnography Workshop (12th May 2015 – all day, free)

I was approached by Dr Ivana Rihova to take part in the following free all day workshop that is to take place at Napier University on the 12th of May 2015. I will be collaborating with Sharon Greenwood (PhD researcher at University of Glasgow) on a practical workshop entitled: “Where do you stand? Reflecting on ethical considerations of using social media data within a visual methods context,” and will be drawing on the discussion chapters of my PhD research around working with social media from self-defined citizen journalists operating during the Vancouver Winter Olympic Games. More details about the workshop and the full event are available below.

Workshop outline:

Social media data can be considered freely available. However, this opens up questions of the epistemological grounding of the research as well as ethical issues related to the researcher’s position in terms of how they chose to present and work with data. This session will not offer a one size fits all approach, but instead will provoke discussion and debate surrounding the use of social media data within visual methods contexts. Focussing on two cases – the citizen journalists of Vancouver 2010 and identity construction through fashion blogs – we will tell a compelling story of the challenges we faced when using social media as data in our own research. The session features a hands-on group exercise where participants will be given a dataset and asked to articulate their own position with respect to working with the data, and to identify the issues that may stem from this.

Location and Time: 9am – 5pm, Tuesday 12th May. The Rivers Suite, Craiglockhart Campus.
What are the roles and application of visual methods and ethnographies in contemporary research? We warmly invite you to a day-long research workshop, organised by researchers in the School of Marketing, Tourism and Languages, where we attempt to answer this question.

Part of the Edinburgh Napier University Researcher Led Initiative, the Visual Methods and Ethnography Workshop is aimed at colleagues from across the Business School, the University and beyond, who wish to develop their knowledge and skills in applying visual methodologies in their research in innovative and critical ways.

The workshop provides a platform on which various research projects and approaches are brought together to communicate the role and potential of ‘the visual’ and the ways in which it can benefit academic research. Over the course of the day, conference-style presentations from leading researchers in (visual) ethnography will be combined with participatory activities and opportunities for the sharing of knowledge and experience. Topics discussed range from the use and analysis of ‘traditional’ visual methods, such as photo-elicitation, academic film-making, semiotics and ethnographies, to research participant co-creation, mash-ups and social media imagery. Guest speakers include Prof Eric Laurier (University of Edinburgh), a world-leading figure in visual methods research; Dr Tijana Rakic (University of Greenwich), an experienced academic and film-maker with interest in ethics in visual research; Dr Diane MacLean (Edinburgh Napier University), a producer and journalist with experience of using commissioned broadcast technologies in academic studies; Ms Anne Burns (University of Sheffield), researcher from Sheffield University’s Visual Social Media Lab; and, Jennifer Jones (University of the West of Scotland) and Sharon Greenwood (University of Glasgow), doctoral researchers interested in the use and ethical implications of using social media images in research.

By attending the workshop, you will:
• Gain appreciation of the importance of visual methods and ethnography in social sciences and tourism in particular
• Extend individual expertise of innovative use of visual research methods and ethnography
• Reflect on ethical issues in using visual material in research
• Apply principles of analysing visual data in an interactive small-group activity
• Connect and exchange ideas with a community of like-minded researchers interested in visual methodologies
Tea/ coffee and refreshments will be provided throughout the day.

​The workshop is free to attend, however we ask that you register by Wednesday 6th May 2015, using the Eventbrite link below:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/visual-methods-and-ethnography-workshop-tickets-16765004580
Free
Contact Details
​Dr Louise Todd (L.Todd@napier.ac.uk), Tel. 0131 455 4409 or Dr Ivana Rihova (I.Rihova@napier.ac.uk), Tel. 0131 455 4613

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Workshop: Social Media In and Around Research, @UniWestScotland

Bit behind on blog posts as been between projects, jobs, phd writing and the dreaded Christmas holiday dip in productivity (which was spent mainly lying on the floor, listening to NPR podcasts and drinking all the coffee) but hopefully this is me caught up now.

I delivered two related workshops at UWS in the last few months relating to social media and postgraduate research. The first was part of a school of education seminar series (I sit between two schools because I have a PhD supervisor in both the School of Media, Culture and Society (Prof. John Robertson) and the School of Education (Prof. Rowena Murray) – makes sense!) and it was basically 3 hours of ‘here is a bunch of things you can do with the internet in and around your research’ with the premise of opening up dialogue between attendees and spark a few ideas about how we could be using the Internet better within our research group.

And since then, I’m going to help record a series of short videos with other PhD students who attend out monthly research group to be added as profiles to Rowena’s website in the coming months. They will sit alongside the videos I made previously relating to the impact of writing retreats.

The second workshop was with Prof. David McGillivray part of the wider university postgraduate research training programme and sat within the academic writing and skills course organised by Gordon Asher.

Slides:

Session overview:

This session focuses on the value of social media for the emerging researcher, both in terms of their academic practice and career advancement. We start by outlining a set of critical commentaries on the role of social media in academic settings, before exploring how PG students may go about creating and maintaining a digital identity as they undertake their research. Consideration will be given to how PG students can differentiate between competing social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter, Linked In, Academia.edu, Research Gate and blogging.

 The session will be theory informed, but practically relevant and students interested in attending should come armed with example from their own practice to share with others.

 Tutors: Professor David McGillivray (@dgmcgillivray)& Jennifer Jones (@jennifermjones), School of Media, Culture and Society’

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Innovation award for @HousingAccess

 

Last July, I delivered 2 days of training for DPHS (Fife) (Disabled Persons Housing Service) in social media, digital storytelling and mobile film making with staff and board members. This morning I found out that they have won an innovation award from Voluntary Action Fife for their Housing 55+ Mentoring programme – and have been blogging, tweeting and making videos since. Well done guys! :-)

Here are the slides that I used for the first part of the training, available on Prezi.

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What I need to write about during February 2014

This is my second post of 2014 that checks in with my writing goals and sets some new ones for the month. As I’m working full time at the moment, it can be quite difficult to be disciplined with my own writing, as especially (I hope!) to have some good news in terms of where restarting my PhD is concerned, so I’m going to make sure I write a small update every month so I can keep tabbed on the process and keep pushing things forward.

Last month I wanted to sharpen my PhD focus,  start to look at my ‘missing’ ethics form and prepare an abstract with Kieran for the Leisure Studies conference in July. Thanks to a writing retreat half way through January, I not only managed to address the ethics form – I completed a full draft (10000 words!), participant information sheets, letters, consent and draft interviews questions and have submitted it to the committee to get approval to interview bloggers and citizen journalists about their perceptions of the Vancouver Winter Olympics as a follow up to the ethnographic data from 2010.

I’ve already wrote about this, but I  am super proud of this achievement as it really has pushed me on in terms of seeing a light at the end of this very long PhD tunnel.

The updated title of my PhD is: Hacking a Virtual Legacy: Uncovering the Digital Storytellers’ of Vancouver’s Social Media Olympics. 

So my goal for February is to turn these 10000 words, along with notes and other materials I have, into a draft of my methodology chapter. I have blocked out this Saturday for a writing day, hoping to fit 6-7 hours of focussed work in. I’m in limbo at the moment so this an exercise is something I can work on quite autonomously until I’ve received feedback.

Kieran is going to be the first author on the Leisure Studies paper as it has taken a focus much closer to his area of perceptions of recreational drug users so he led on the abstract, where I’m going to write about the methodology and twitter data gathering (something I’ve been keen to write formally about) and to help explore some of the ethical issues around topic areas such as drugs and social media. We have split reading duties here – I’ve invested in some new books (such as Fuchs’ “Social Media: A Critical Introduction“) and looking at the opportunities and challenges of using open tools to manage social data in this way.

I’m going to work on my own abstract relating to my updated PhD work for the Leisure Studies conference as I’m part of the steering committee (there has been over 70 abstracts submitted on the first call for papers!) – I need to have this completed in the next few days ideally, so this is a sooner rather than later goal.

Finally, as we work through February towards the first series of community media and digital storytelling workshops as part of my Digital Commonwealth role, I am going to be working on adapting the resources that my colleagues have been working on for a Buddypress platform used for the Schools’ programme and then ‘remixing’ the resources on Mozilla’s Webmaker to take them from a schools to a community learning/adult education environment. The planning stages will dominate my February.

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Project: #digitalsentinel, towards the launch!

It has been a while since I have updated on the Digital Sentinel, a community news agency being developed in Wester Hailes, Edinburgh – and a lot has happened in the last few months. The project is currently funded by the Carnegie Trust Neighbourhood News’ programme and my role of community media development worker has been focused on getting the website, volunteers and content creators ready for a formal launch of the news site in October 2013.

I’m keen to give an update on my own website as a few people have contacted me about the process behind the Digital Sentinel and sometimes it is good to just lay out some of the key activity that has happened over the last few months to give a idea of exactly how much has been achieved by the team in this time.

It is great to be able to list a number of key mile-stones that we have reached since beginning work with the Carnegie Trust and others.

We have ran 4 sets of training workshops for Digital Sentinel reporters – one in the afternoon, one in the evening since July. There is one left before the launch – as well as additional support session from the Media Trust around media ethics and sustainable community journalism.

As part of training, the Digital Sentinel team have covered a number of events on behalf of other organisations. We have attended the AHRC Connected Communities conference at Herriot Watt, captured resident opinion on the Fountationbridge re-developments, amplifed the Wester Hailes fun run and covered the move of the Wester Hailes Health Agency to the new Healthy Living Centre.


The Digital Sentinel has a light web presence on social media sites such as Twitter, Facebook, Flickr and YouTube. These sites has been used to host training content which includes video interviews between reporters &  video interviews with local workers and activists, photographs from events that reporters have attended, and more significantly, the live-tweeting of a community council open meeting regarding the public transport access to the new Healthy Living centre.

We are now working to develop the final design for the website (which will be launched in October) and are considering the governance structure and ethical media policy for covering particular events. This will include news, digital storytelling, event-based reporting and creative responses.

Although the Digital Sentinel is an online channel predominantly, and much of the content will be produced using mobile devices, there are discussions relating to access in terms of technology and in terms of literacies. These will  be developed over the coming months to provide creative solutions so that the Sentinel can be accessed and contributed to by as many local residents as possible.

Furthermore, as our current wave of Digital Sentinel reporters become more confident using these tools in a community journalism, the day to day running of the website and communication channels will begin to be taken over by residents (sooner rather than later) so that the Digital Sentinel can start to develop as the hub for all things Wester Hailes related.

Onwards to towards the launch, I am going to leave you with one of my favourite videos from the project development. Enjoy! :-)

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