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Workshop: Social Media In and Around Research, @UniWestScotland

Bit behind on blog posts as been between projects, jobs, phd writing and the dreaded Christmas holiday dip in productivity (which was spent mainly lying on the floor, listening to NPR podcasts and drinking all the coffee) but hopefully this is me caught up now.

I delivered two related workshops at UWS in the last few months relating to social media and postgraduate research. The first was part of a school of education seminar series (I sit between two schools because I have a PhD supervisor in both the School of Media, Culture and Society (Prof. John Robertson) and the School of Education (Prof. Rowena Murray) – makes sense!) and it was basically 3 hours of ‘here is a bunch of things you can do with the internet in and around your research’ with the premise of opening up dialogue between attendees and spark a few ideas about how we could be using the Internet better within our research group.

And since then, I’m going to help record a series of short videos with other PhD students who attend out monthly research group to be added as profiles to Rowena’s website in the coming months. They will sit alongside the videos I made previously relating to the impact of writing retreats.

The second workshop was with Prof. David McGillivray part of the wider university postgraduate research training programme and sat within the academic writing and skills course organised by Gordon Asher.

Slides:

Session overview:

This session focuses on the value of social media for the emerging researcher, both in terms of their academic practice and career advancement. We start by outlining a set of critical commentaries on the role of social media in academic settings, before exploring how PG students may go about creating and maintaining a digital identity as they undertake their research. Consideration will be given to how PG students can differentiate between competing social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter, Linked In, Academia.edu, Research Gate and blogging.

 The session will be theory informed, but practically relevant and students interested in attending should come armed with example from their own practice to share with others.

 Tutors: Professor David McGillivray (@dgmcgillivray)& Jennifer Jones (@jennifermjones), School of Media, Culture and Society’

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Innovation award for @HousingAccess

 

Last July, I delivered 2 days of training for DPHS (Fife) (Disabled Persons Housing Service) in social media, digital storytelling and mobile film making with staff and board members. This morning I found out that they have won an innovation award from Voluntary Action Fife for their Housing 55+ Mentoring programme – and have been blogging, tweeting and making videos since. Well done guys! :-)

Here are the slides that I used for the first part of the training, available on Prezi.

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What I need to write about during February 2014

This is my second post of 2014 that checks in with my writing goals and sets some new ones for the month. As I’m working full time at the moment, it can be quite difficult to be disciplined with my own writing, as especially (I hope!) to have some good news in terms of where restarting my PhD is concerned, so I’m going to make sure I write a small update every month so I can keep tabbed on the process and keep pushing things forward.

Last month I wanted to sharpen my PhD focus,  start to look at my ‘missing’ ethics form and prepare an abstract with Kieran for the Leisure Studies conference in July. Thanks to a writing retreat half way through January, I not only managed to address the ethics form – I completed a full draft (10000 words!), participant information sheets, letters, consent and draft interviews questions and have submitted it to the committee to get approval to interview bloggers and citizen journalists about their perceptions of the Vancouver Winter Olympics as a follow up to the ethnographic data from 2010.

I’ve already wrote about this, but I  am super proud of this achievement as it really has pushed me on in terms of seeing a light at the end of this very long PhD tunnel.

The updated title of my PhD is: Hacking a Virtual Legacy: Uncovering the Digital Storytellers’ of Vancouver’s Social Media Olympics. 

So my goal for February is to turn these 10000 words, along with notes and other materials I have, into a draft of my methodology chapter. I have blocked out this Saturday for a writing day, hoping to fit 6-7 hours of focussed work in. I’m in limbo at the moment so this an exercise is something I can work on quite autonomously until I’ve received feedback.

Kieran is going to be the first author on the Leisure Studies paper as it has taken a focus much closer to his area of perceptions of recreational drug users so he led on the abstract, where I’m going to write about the methodology and twitter data gathering (something I’ve been keen to write formally about) and to help explore some of the ethical issues around topic areas such as drugs and social media. We have split reading duties here – I’ve invested in some new books (such as Fuchs’ “Social Media: A Critical Introduction“) and looking at the opportunities and challenges of using open tools to manage social data in this way.

I’m going to work on my own abstract relating to my updated PhD work for the Leisure Studies conference as I’m part of the steering committee (there has been over 70 abstracts submitted on the first call for papers!) – I need to have this completed in the next few days ideally, so this is a sooner rather than later goal.

Finally, as we work through February towards the first series of community media and digital storytelling workshops as part of my Digital Commonwealth role, I am going to be working on adapting the resources that my colleagues have been working on for a Buddypress platform used for the Schools’ programme and then ‘remixing’ the resources on Mozilla’s Webmaker to take them from a schools to a community learning/adult education environment. The planning stages will dominate my February.

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Project: #digitalsentinel, towards the launch!

It has been a while since I have updated on the Digital Sentinel, a community news agency being developed in Wester Hailes, Edinburgh – and a lot has happened in the last few months. The project is currently funded by the Carnegie Trust Neighbourhood News’ programme and my role of community media development worker has been focused on getting the website, volunteers and content creators ready for a formal launch of the news site in October 2013.

I’m keen to give an update on my own website as a few people have contacted me about the process behind the Digital Sentinel and sometimes it is good to just lay out some of the key activity that has happened over the last few months to give a idea of exactly how much has been achieved by the team in this time.

It is great to be able to list a number of key mile-stones that we have reached since beginning work with the Carnegie Trust and others.

We have ran 4 sets of training workshops for Digital Sentinel reporters – one in the afternoon, one in the evening since July. There is one left before the launch – as well as additional support session from the Media Trust around media ethics and sustainable community journalism.

As part of training, the Digital Sentinel team have covered a number of events on behalf of other organisations. We have attended the AHRC Connected Communities conference at Herriot Watt, captured resident opinion on the Fountationbridge re-developments, amplifed the Wester Hailes fun run and covered the move of the Wester Hailes Health Agency to the new Healthy Living Centre.


The Digital Sentinel has a light web presence on social media sites such as Twitter, Facebook, Flickr and YouTube. These sites has been used to host training content which includes video interviews between reporters &  video interviews with local workers and activists, photographs from events that reporters have attended, and more significantly, the live-tweeting of a community council open meeting regarding the public transport access to the new Healthy Living centre.

We are now working to develop the final design for the website (which will be launched in October) and are considering the governance structure and ethical media policy for covering particular events. This will include news, digital storytelling, event-based reporting and creative responses.

Although the Digital Sentinel is an online channel predominantly, and much of the content will be produced using mobile devices, there are discussions relating to access in terms of technology and in terms of literacies. These will  be developed over the coming months to provide creative solutions so that the Sentinel can be accessed and contributed to by as many local residents as possible.

Furthermore, as our current wave of Digital Sentinel reporters become more confident using these tools in a community journalism, the day to day running of the website and communication channels will begin to be taken over by residents (sooner rather than later) so that the Digital Sentinel can start to develop as the hub for all things Wester Hailes related.

Onwards to towards the launch, I am going to leave you with one of my favourite videos from the project development. Enjoy! :-)

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Token slides shot.

Presentation: CILIPS 2013 Annual Conference: Social Media for Community Engagement

After their annual gathering in October 2012, I was invited to return and speak to delegates at the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals Scotland (CILIPS) Annual Conference in Dundee on the 3rd and 4th of June. I’ve had a good working relationship with CILIPS over the last year, working closely (and enjoying cakes.. whilst plotting hard of course) with Cathy, their director – doing several social media workshops for them at events and taking over some of the web work in the office before they hired their new web and policy officer, Sean McNamara.

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Dundee at 5am from my hotel room.

This time I was asked to speak to a larger audience at their annual conference (I expected a workshop of 20 odd in October, and ended up with standing room only and librarians sitting crossed legged at my feet :-) ) and to focus on practical case studies where I have used social media for elements of community engagement – such as citizen journalism projects, peer-to-peer support and digital inclusion projects.

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Speaking in the ‘big room’.

It was the largest room I’ve presented to in a very long time, certainly since I took time out from my PhD, so it was good to get flung back into the deep-end in terms of presenting work to larger audiences. It was also good to be able to use the presentation as an opportunity to reflect on the relationship between library and information services and the projects I’ve been working on in the last year since #citizenrelay.

As I’ve done something around social media before, I was keen not only to review some of the underlying principles that I had discussed previously in the libraries conference context – but also to ensure that I had time to talk about some of the living, breathing examples that were happening at the moment. I’m often introduced as the person who is going to talk about the new fangle technologies, like social media and the internet is a new thing that needs to be considered – which is ironic really when the first group of people I followed when I started using twitter “properly” in 2008 (been a user since Jan 2007) were librarians.

Similarly, pretty much all of the speakers at this year’s event had online and social media activity embedded as part of what they were talking about, rather than an optional extra tacked on at the end. Therefore, I took time to emphasis the evolution of the online environment and the empheral nature of online services as tools become more ubiquitous, get bought up, chewed up and re-appropriated. We just need to think about the fact that O’Reilly’s (often over-used) definition of “Web 2.0″ is approaching its 10th anniversary!

With reference to social media surgeries, citizen journalism, community new channels and projects such as Our Digital Planet, I emphasised that some of the best projects that incorporate the use of social media as those which focus on developing a critical practice around the tools, especially when they challenge existing ways of working and that often social media as a community engagement tool tends to amplify existing activity – be in an event, an organisation or peer-to-peer learning activity – rather than starting from scratch, or isolating it within a vacuum.

I’ve embedded the prezi from the presentation below for more information:

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