Monthly Archives: July 2010

Social Media Strategies: guest workshop at the BIAD, Birmingham (20th of July, 2010)

On the 20th of July, I was invited to host a workshop at the Birmingham Institute of Art and Design (BIAD) Research Summer School about using Social Media to promote research. As promised, I’m sticking the presentation online so that those who were there can get a little bit more information based on the discussions that were had during and after the session. 

The workshop’s abstract was as follows:
 
This 90 minute session will explore the use of social media tools for promoting creative practice. It will track the ongoing history of social online technologies, unpick the common myths associated with web 2.0 platforms and discuss the cycle of activity required in order to maintain a creative profile online. This workshop will provide you with an opportunity to brainstorm strategies surrounding the use of social media for promoting independent and group creative work.

 

 
Some useful links and further discussion:
 
Social Media for Research and Promotion
 
 
My PhD colleague Ana Adi, a PR and new media specialist, has many detailed resources about web 2.0 promoting, social media tools for research and data collection tools for social sciences and humanities research. These range from social timeline software for arranging historical texts to using social media in music promotion. A rich resource for exploring ways to integrate social media into your research practise. 
 
 
Some visuals which explains different tools and different statistics which relate to the growth of the social web. A nice way to look at some of the emerging discussions and challenges relating to social media.
 
Digital Britain
 
 
This relates to some of the questions that were asked about digital exclusion, inclusion and engagement (specifically the stats of users) – these are still very much for interpretation but it is worth looking into the work of the research centre interactive cultures within Birmingham’s Media School around the Digital Britain report and Digital Inclusion Plan
 
Twitterfalls (Pro and Cons)
 
http://pistachioconsulting.com/twitter-presentations/ (How to present while people are twittering)
(Some prelim research findings – with a lengthy bibliography – on twitter and conferences)
http://brodiesnotes.blogspot.com/2010/02/curated-posts-liveblogging-science.html (a fantastic curated list of pros and cons of twittering and using social media and conferences)
 
Social Media and Olympics
 
http://www.andymiah.net (My PhD Supervisor’s work)
http://www.andymiah.net/2010/07/17/media-blueprint-for-london-2012/ (Important reading – blueprint for Media 2012, a network of media hubs around the UK)
http://www.andfestival.org.uk/ (North West regional festival of new cinema and digital culture – working closely with the Media 2012 blueprint)
http://www.citizenseye.org (A Leicester citizen media hub – an excellent example of how local, citizen journalism has been taken up in my local area of Leicestershire – I will be working closely with them during the run up and during Games time)
 
http://www.creativetechnology.org (W2 Arts and Culture House – one of the case studies I used from Vancouver)
http://www.truenorthmediahouse.com (True North Media House – one of the case studies I used from Vancouver.)
 
For more up to date (or dynamic) information, I use delicious frequently to save and share interesting links – feel free to connect :-)
 
 
 
 
 

Posted via email from Jennifer Jones’s Posterous

Social Media Strategies: guest workshop at the BIAD, Birmingham (20th of July, 2010)

On the 20th of July, I was invited to host a workshop at the Birmingham Institute of Art and Design (BIAD) Research Summer School about using Social Media to promote research. As promised, I’m sticking the presentation online so that those who were there can get a little bit more information based on the discussions that were had during and after the session. 

The workshop’s abstract was as follows:
 
This 90 minute session will explore the use of social media tools for promoting creative practice. It will track the ongoing history of social online technologies, unpick the common myths associated with web 2.0 platforms and discuss the cycle of activity required in order to maintain a creative profile online. This workshop will provide you with an opportunity to brainstorm strategies surrounding the use of social media for promoting independent and group creative work.

 

 
Some useful links and further discussion:
 
Social Media for Research and Promotion
 
 
My PhD colleague Ana Adi, a PR and new media specialist, has many detailed resources about web 2.0 promoting, social media tools for research and data collection tools for social sciences and humanities research. These range from social timeline software for arranging historical texts to using social media in music promotion. A rich resource for exploring ways to integrate social media into your research practise. 
 
 
Some visuals which explains different tools and different statistics which relate to the growth of the social web. A nice way to look at some of the emerging discussions and challenges relating to social media.
 
Digital Britain
 
 
This relates to some of the questions that were asked about digital exclusion, inclusion and engagement (specifically the stats of users) – these are still very much for interpretation but it is worth looking into the work of the research centre interactive cultures within Birmingham’s Media School around the Digital Britain report and Digital Inclusion Plan
 
Twitterfalls (Pro and Cons)
 
http://pistachioconsulting.com/twitter-presentations/ (How to present while people are twittering)
http://www.scribd.com/doc/16287533/More-than-just-passing-notes-in-class-The-Twitterenabled-backchannel (Some prelim research findings – with a lengthy bibliography – on twitter and conferences)
http://brodiesnotes.blogspot.com/2010/02/curated-posts-liveblogging-science.html (a fantastic curated list of pros and cons of twittering and using social media and conferences)
 
Social Media and Olympics
 
http://www.andymiah.net (My PhD Supervisor’s work)
http://www.andymiah.net/2010/07/17/media-blueprint-for-london-2012/ (Important reading – blueprint for Media 2012, a network of media hubs around the UK)
http://www.andfestival.org.uk/ (North West regional festival of new cinema and digital culture – working closely with the Media 2012 blueprint)
http://www.citizenseye.org (A Leicester citizen media hub – an excellent example of how local, citizen journalism has been taken up in my local area of Leicestershire – I will be working closely with them during the run up and during Games time)
 
http://www.creativetechnology.org (W2 Arts and Culture House – one of the case studies I used from Vancouver)
http://www.truenorthmediahouse.com (True North Media House – one of the case studies I used from Vancouver.)
 
For more up to date (or dynamic) information, I use delicious frequently to save and share interesting links – feel free to connect :-)
 
 
 
 
 

The Depth of Digital Participation: Measuring the Unmeasurable, BCU: 19th July, 2010

On the 19th of July, Birmingham City University hosted a seminar on “Measuring the Unmeasurable” – a discussion led event to explore the meaning and the measurement of digital participation, focusing on the areas of reach, breadth and depth set out by the Digital Britain report. The event was targeted towards academics from broad “digital” media and cultural studies and policy makers, activists, community media workers and social media advisers.

Alongside presentations from Paul Watson (Director, Digital Economy Hub for Inclusion through the Digital Economy), Catherine Bunting (Director of Research, Arts Council England), Alison Preston (Senior Research Associate, Ofcom) there was also a panel discussion including Nick Booth (PodNosh) and Vishalakshi Roy (Senior Business Develop Manager, Audiences Central).

The afternoon session included a workshop breakout session which allowed participants to discuss the measurement of reach, breadth and depth further. This was a broad and open-ended session – which is reflected in the terminology around the digital participation plan itself. I was asked to facilitate the workshop on Depth, which is defined in the Digital Participation Plan were as follows:

Depth of use refers to using social networks and content creation and sharing, including user-generated content and self-publishing.

Depth of use will be monitored through levels of confidence, understanding of types of content, perceptions of personal benefits both economic and social, and knowledge of risks and how to mitigate them.

The Depth workshop turned out to be the most popular of the three terms (which makes for interesting discussion within its own right) – and as the session was so busy, it was quite difficult in the time allowed to have a focused discussion with larger numbers. Instead, the group of 30+ was split into smaller groups to discuss the group proposed issues of motivation, accessibility, funding and attendance.

After 20-30 minutes of discussion, groups were asked to then write down on post it notes measurement of successes and measurement of challenges relating to their chosen topic. Unsurprisingly, there were few measurements of successes – with much of the focus being made towards the challenges of measuring the depth of digital participation through solely looking at user generated content and social networking.

As there was so much to be discussed, in a rather short period of time, what can be said is that there is a definite pull towards “depth” research. I’d associated this particular type of research as being majorly qualitative (or as one speaker referred to as being “informal” research) where much of the questions and challenges posed were incapable of being answered using statistics or survey data. We were referring to case studies relating to our own separate industries, with many cross overs between personal reflections and conversations with those who are affected with the issues suggested. From this, I personally enjoyed seeing the indirect request for more qualitative research (but I am interested in ethnographic practice (;) – and the links between being innovative with funds and resources to avoid being sucked in the box ticking trap. The larger goal of getting different sectors to talk and work together was reinforced across the group.

What I did promise was to share the notes and scribbles from the session so that those who attended the depth session could unpick my handwriting and use it within their own reflections. I’ve added them below as part of a flickr slideshow for this purpose:

More to follow…

My introduction to the #tagginganna project

From tomorrow I begin my role as a research assistant over the next 3 months for the #tagginganna project based at the University of Leicester (between the Department of English and Student Support and Development). The project focuses on online tools for learning and teaching and the process of the group annotation of key class texts. This is in order to explore the possibility of sharing notes on literature, to allow students pinpoint key themes and ideas as a group – rather than relying solely on a tutor to prompt them in class. This opens up an interesting debate about intellectual properties, learning styles and the specificity of the new media tools to use within these circumstances.

Stuart Johnson, (who joins Mark Rawlinson and Alex Moseley as the project team), has been blogging about the project since August last year, states the aims as follows:

Project aims

The aims of the project are:

  • to test the pedagogical benefits of tagging and commenting on a shared online work of fiction (Anna Karenina) by a small group of third year undergraduates, and using this collaborative markup as a discussion point in face-to-face seminars: this is focussed on making meaning explicit;
  • to test the pedgogical and community-development benefits of sharing comments and tags across multiple cohorts, focusing on the new meanings and affordances offered by pervasive and incremental tags;
  • to determine the technical suitability of a number of freely available tagging/commenting tools to support the above activity;
  • to test the pedagogical benefits of tagging and commenting on a shared e-book within the BlackBoard VLE, by a small group of distance-learning postgraduates;
  • to develop one or more pedagogical models for the use of tagging and commenting on online texts within a higher education context;
  • to report on the technical suitability of a number of freely available tools and platforms to enable pedagogically-effective tagging and commenting within a higher education context;
  • to form the basis for discussions with publishers (initially Routledge) on the use of e-books within academic courses.

The project has been documented online for nearly a year now with related links being saved under #tagginganna on Delicious and Friendfeed. I will be adding to this archive as the weeks progress.